Camel's Hump, Vermont & Colloidal Oatmeal

Winter Hiking:

Camel's Hump, Vermont


and the skin protective factors of

c o l l o i d a l
O a t m e a l


 

This weekend's excursion: a quick trip to my old stomping grounds of Stowe, Vermont - a hike up Camel's Hump, a night out in Stowe, and a quick jaunt down Church Street in Burlington. Plus tips on how to protect your skin from the winter elements.


 Photo cred to Sara  

Photo cred to Sara  


Let's be honest - I enjoy summer hiking more than winter hiking.  

But there's something so breathtakingly majestic about snow-covered flora, something so familiar about the smell of frozen pines, and something so invigorating about summiting a peak covered with ice and howling with gusts of wind strong enough to blow you over.  

I always say that Vermont has my east-coast heart, as I have such treasured memories there. I've lived and worked all across the United States, and I can confidently say I feel most at home in Vermont. 


 A huge shout-out to my good friend, Sara, for being my weekend Instagram model. Stay tuned for an adventure we are planning together in April! 

A huge shout-out to my good friend, Sara, for being my weekend Instagram model. Stay tuned for an adventure we are planning together in April! 


Camel's Hump 

 is the third-highest peak in Vermont, following Mount Mansfield and Killington Peak. It's a nice half-day hike located in the Green Mountains; not nearly as strenuous as Mansfield, but breathtaking views, nonetheless (well, at least in the summer months - don't expect ANY views during the winter months). 


 No view, per usual winter weather. But those pines...

No view, per usual winter weather. But those pines...

 Burrows Trail to Long Trail - a moderate 4.2mi round-trip hike

Burrows Trail to Long Trail - a moderate 4.2mi round-trip hike


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Camel's Hump is well-known for a few reasons: it has a very distinctive-looking peak, and is featured on the state quarter of Vermont. 


 Sara on the summit 

Sara on the summit 

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What's Colloidal Oatmeal? 

It's so important to protect your skin when outside in the colder temperatures, whether it's hiking, skiing, snowboarding, etc. One of my favorite skin protectants is called colloidal oatmeal - yep, it's oatmeal, but not exactly the same kind you eat.

Those of us in dermatology recommend colloidal oatmeal as an adjunctive treatment to help calm certain skin conditions, most commonly atopic dermatitis ("eczema") and other xerotic skin conditions (seriously dehydrated // dry skin). It comes in a few forms - I'm a fan of:

Aveeno Soothing Bath treatment


 Anyone else remember their parents throwing you in the tub with this stuff? Chicken pox, eczema, sunburns - this was a staple.

Anyone else remember their parents throwing you in the tub with this stuff? Chicken pox, eczema, sunburns - this was a staple.


 This finely milled powder is added to a lukewarm - NOT HOT - bathtub. Helps calm down irritated skin, or dry, winter skin. Leaves your skin feeling soft, moisturized, and calmed.   If this stuff was as popular as bath bombs are, people would have much happier skin. 

This finely milled powder is added to a lukewarm - NOT HOT - bathtub. Helps calm down irritated skin, or dry, winter skin. Leaves your skin feeling soft, moisturized, and calmed. 

If this stuff was as popular as bath bombs are, people would have much happier skin. 


I'm excited to see that many popular beauty brands have jumped on the colloidal oatmeal bandwagon, including First Aid Beauty and Tatcha. My favorite colloidal oatmeal cream (for both face and body ... the only cream I'll use on both my face and body... ) is:

First Aid Beauty Ultra Repair Cream

 LOVE this stuff. A staple for those of us who spend lots of time outside in the cold months, and are prone to eczema. Sara tried this post-hike, pre-going out and loved it, too - didn't irritate her sensitive skin. 

LOVE this stuff. A staple for those of us who spend lots of time outside in the cold months, and are prone to eczema. Sara tried this post-hike, pre-going out and loved it, too - didn't irritate her sensitive skin. 


I slather this stuff on my face before hiking, skiing, or snowboarding. Or sometimes just before walking out to my truck in -30 degree weather.  If I don't, my face is visibly windburned and red for days. 

I used to use Aquaphor as a skin protectant many moons ago when I was a snowboard instructor - trust me, this stuff won't make you break out like Aquaphor. AND it's suitable for us sensitive-skinned girls. 

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Need some more science to back up my love of colloidal oatmeal? Copy & past link below: 

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25607907

ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR DERMATOLOGY PRACTITIONER BEFORE USING THE PRODUCTS DISCUSSED IN THIS BLOG, AND BEFORE PARTICIPATING IN ANY ACTIVITY DISCUSSED IN THIS BLOG


 Wrapping up the weekend right - a Little Wolf for my little wolf 

Wrapping up the weekend right - a Little Wolf for my little wolf 


Until Next Time,


B E A U T I F U L
T R A V E L S